Who’s who at Hallam

Who's who at Hallam

Bill MacDonald

Managing Director

PROGRAMMES
NEWS
ENGINEERING
SALES
ADMINISTRATION

KEITH SKUES
Programme Director

Roger Moffat
DJ Presenter

Bill Crozier
DJ Presenter

Johnny Moran
DJ Presenter

Jean Doyle
Womens Editor

Brenda Ellison
Presenter

Liz Davies
Presenter

Ray Stuart
DJ Presenter

Colin Slade
DJ Presenter

Beverley Chubb
Librarian/Presenter

Frank Carpenter
Presentation Assistant

Kelly Temple
Presenter

Ernest Marvin
Religious Producer

IAN RUFUS
News Editor

Robin Etherington
Morning Editor

Jim Greensmith
News Reporter

Roger Brooks
News Reporter

Jon Silverman
News Reporter

Jonathan Craymer
News Reporter

Libby Smith
News Reporter

Stuart Linnell
Sports Editor

Colin Maitland
Features Editor

DERRICK CONNOLLY
Chief Engineer

Mike Lindsay
Asst. Chief Engineer

Stuart Stubbs
Sound Engineer

Bridget Whittaker
Technical Operator

Mike Rouse
Technical Operator

Mick Adams
Trainee Engineer

Derek Taylor
Handyman

DARRYL J. ADAMS
Sales & Publicity Manager

Marian Brook
Publicity Assistant

Audrey Furniss
Sales Executive

Brian Murray
Sales Executive

Steve Perry
Sales Executive

Bill Young
Sales Executive

John Green
Traffic Clerk

Lynn Collington
Sales Administrator

Ann Tennant
Copy Typist

GRAHAM BLINCOW
Company Secretary

Graham Blincow

Ellen Rhodes
Senior Secretary

Diane Kitching
Secretary (Accounts)

Janice Bell
Accounts Clerk

Bernadette Kulinski
Receptionist

Christine Chambers
Typist

Mena Hale
Typist

Carole Bates
Typist

Susan Hadfield
Typist

Rachel Bell
Secretary

Julie Sivell
Corres Clerk

Kathleen Devine
General Assistant

JULIE SIVELL

CAROLE BATES

MENA HALE

DIANE KITCHING

ELLEN RHODES

JANICE BELL

BERNADETTE KULINSKI

RACHEL BELL

Studio guests on Radio Hallam

STUDIO GUESTS ON RADIO HALLAM

A

ACE
ALEXANDER: David
ARMATRADING: Joan
ANDERSON: Moira
ANTHONY: Tony
APRIL
ARGENT: Rod (ARGENT)
ARKWRIGHT ARROWS
ARTUS: Andy (A RAINCOAT)
ASHLEY: Steve
AZNAVOUR: Charles

B

BABE RUTH
BALL: Kenny
BANDILEGS
BARCLAY JAMES HARVEST
BARNUM: H.P.
BARRON KNIGHTS
BAY CITY ROLLERS
BATT: Mike
BEANO
BECK: Steve
BEDFORD: David
BELL: Maggie
BENSON: Gary
BERRY: Dave
BERRY: Mike
BIDDU
BLACK OAK ARKANSAS
BLUE: Barry
BOLAN: Marc
BRISTOL: Johnny
BRETT MARVIN
BROOK: Julian
BROTHERHOOD OF MAN
BROWN: Dougie
BROWNE: Arthur
BUBBLES
BUGATTI & MUSKER
BULL DOG

C

CAINE: Marti
CAMPBELL: Junior
CASSIDY: David
CLANCY
CLAYTON: Obie
CHANTER: Doreen
CHILLI-WILLI & THE RED HOT PEPPERS
CHIPS
CHARLES: Ronnie
CHRISTIAN: Marty (Ex. NEW SEEKERS)
CHRISTIE: Tony
CHRISTMAS: Keith
CHOPYN
COCKER: Joe
COLE: Billy
CONRAD: Jess
COOL BREEZE
COYNE: Kevin
CRAWFORD: Jimmy
CROMPTON: Colin
CURVED AIR

D

D’ABO: Mike
DALTRY: Roger
DANA
DAWSON: Les
DAWSON-READ: John
DAY: Oliver
DE SYKES: Stephanie
DEE: Dave
DIAMOND: Jim
DIVINE: Sidney
DOCTOR FEELGOOD
DRAGONFLY
DRIFTIN
DUNCAN: Lesley

E

EDDY: Duane
EDMUNDS: Dave
EDWARDS: J. Vincent
ELECTRIC LIGHT ORCHESTRA
ENO
ENTWHISTLE: John (THE WHO)
ESSEX: David
EVERETT: Vince

F

FAIRWEATHER-LOW: Andy
FANCY
FERRY: Brian
FINNIUS FOGG
FIVEPENNY PIECE
FOGG
FONTAINE: Nola
FORD: Dean
FORSYTH: Bruce
FORTUNES
FOUR TOPS
FOX
FRASER: Andy
FREEMAN: Alan A.
FREEMAN: Dave

G

GALLAGHER & LYLE
GAYNOR: Gloria
GENESIS
GEORDIE
GILLESPIE: Dana
GLITTER BAND
GLOVER: Roger
GORMAN: John (SCAFFOLD)
GRAHAM: Eve
GRANT: Lee & Marie
GREENAWAY: Roger
GREENGAGE
GUYS & DOLLS

H

HALFBREED
HAMILTON: George IV
HAMMILL: Claire
HAMMOND: Albert
HARDING: Mike
HARLEY: Steve & COCKNEY REBEL
HARPER: Roy
HARPO
HARRIS: Rolf
HARVEY: Alex (SENSATIONAL ALEX HARVEY BAND)
HATCH: Tony
HAWKES: Chip (Ex. TREMELOES)
HAYWORTH: Bryn
HAYWARD: Justin
HAZZARD: Tony
HELLO
HELMS: Jimmy
HENTSCHEL: David
HILL: Vince
HOPE & KEEN
HOWE: Catherine
HOWELL: Eddie
HUES CORPORATION
HUNTER: Ian (MOTT THE HOOPLE)
HYLAND: Brian

J

JACK THE LAD
JARAMILLO: Pepe
JET
JIGSAW
JOEL: Billy
JOHN: Elton
JONES: Jack
JONES: Jimmy
JONES: Paul
JONES: Salena
JONES: Tammy
JONES: Tom
JORDAN: Dave
JUDGE DREAD

K

KAMAHL
KELLY: Peter D.
KENT: Cindy
KING: Nosmo
KRISTINE
KISSOON: Mac & Katie
KITTER: Roger
KOKKTE: Leo
KURSAAL FLYERS

L

LAINE: Frankie
LANCASTER: Neil
LANGFORD: Pete
LATTER: Gene
LAVERNE: Roger (TORNADOS)
LEE: John (NEW WORLD)
LEWIS: Linda
LEYTON: Paul (Ex. NEW SEEKERS)
LIEUTENANT PIGEON
LIGHT FANTASTIC
LIMMIE & FAMILY COOKING
LODGE: John (MOODY BLUES)
LOVE: Geoff
LULU
LYNAM: Ray

M

MADAME
MANFRED MANN
MARTIN: George
MARTIN: Ray
MARSDEN: Gerry (GERRY & PACEMAKERS)
MARTELL: Lena
MANZANERA: Phil
MATTHEWS: Al
MEDICINE HEAD
MELLY: George
MERRUWYN
MILK N’ COOKIES
MILLS: Gladys
McGEAR: Mike
McGUINESS FLINT
McTELL: Ralph
MILLER: Steve
MILLICAN & NESBITT
MONKHOUSE: Bob
MOODY BLUES
MOON: Bobby
MOONRIDER
MOORE: G. T.
MOTT THE HOOPLE
MR BIG
MUD
MULDAUR: Maria

N

NASH: Johnny
NEKTAR
NEW FACES
NEW VAUDEVILLE BAND
NEWMAN: Tom
NOONE: Peter

O

O’CONNOR: Des
OLSSON: Nigel
ORBISON: Roy
O’SULLIVAN: Gilbert

P

PAN’S PEOPLE
PAPER LACE
PATTO: Mike
PAUL: Lyn
PHILIP & VANESSA
PILOT
PITNEY: Gene
PLANXTY
POWELL: Cozy
PRETTY THINGS
PRICE: Alan
PROCOL HARUM
PROTHEROE: Brian
PUSSY FOOT (Ex. SPRINGFIELD REVIVAL)

Q

QUATRO: Suzie
QUEEN

R

RAINBOW: Christopher
RARE BIRD
READING: Wilma
REED: Les
RICHARD: Cliff
RODEN: Jess
RONSON: Mick
ROSE: Tim
ROXY MUSIC
RUBETTES
ROSSALL: John (ex. GLITTER BAND)
RUFFIN: Jimmy

S

SAILOR
SARSTEDT: Peter
SAWANA: Kenjii
SCAFFOLD
SCOTT: Jimmy
SEDAKA: Neil
SEEKERS
SETTLERS
SHAMBLES
SHAPIRO: Helen
SHEARSTON: Gary
SHEER ELEGANCE
SHELLEY: Peter
SHEPTONE & DIBBENS
SHORTWAVE BAND
SHOWADDYWADDY
SIFFRE: Labi
SIMMONS: Carl
SKYBAND
SLADE
SMOKEY
SNAFU
SOFT MACHINE
SON OF A GUN
SPARKLE: Kristine
SPARROW (Ex. HARMONY GRASS)
SPEEDY KEEN
SPLINTER
STACKRIDGE
STAINTON: Chris & TUNDRA
STARDUST: Alvin
STEALERS WHEEL
STEELEYE SPAN
STEWART: Al
STEVENS: Mark
STOLLER: Mike
STRAWBS
STRING DRIVEN THING
SULLIVAN: Big Jim
SUPERTRAMP
SUZETTE
SWARBRIGG
SWEET REASON
SWEET SENSATION
SYREETA

T

10 c.c.
TALISMAN
TANGERINE DREAM
THOMAS: Ray (MOODY BLUES)
THREE DEGREES
THUNDER THIGHS
TIGER TIM
TONTO
TOWNSEND: Simon
TRAPEZE
TRAVIS: Paul
TREMELOES
TRENT: Jackie
TROGGS

U

URIAH HEEP

V

VAUGHAN: Frankie

W

WALKER BROTHERS (Gary)
WAYNE: Carl
WHISKEY: Nancy
WILDE: Stacy
WILLIAMS: Moon
WINGFIELD: Pete
WOMBLES
WOOD: Ron
WOODS: Terry & Gay
WRIGHT: Stevie

Y

YELLOW BIRD
YIN & YAN
YIP: Frances
YOUNG: Paul
YOUNGER: Col

Keith Skues

Keith Skues

Richard Keith Skues has always been interested in show business. From the age of 10 he wanted to be a radio announcer. His first public appearance was via a perambulator but his publicity handout assures us that it was in a parish church pantomime. He appeared annually in various productions, and at the age of 16 wrote and produced a full length youth variety show. Keith was Youth Leader of his church club.

About this time he founded and edited the “Youth Fellowship Times” (1956-1958).

He was called up for national service in 1958 and admits there was more to it than marching up and down the parade square. Whilst stationed at RAF Chivenor he wrote “The History of Heanton Punchardon”, one of Britain’s oldest hamlets in the county of Devon.

At the beginning of 1959 Keith was posted to Germany and he secured, wangled, maneuvered (we are not told how) a post to British Forces Network in Cologne. He began as a presentation assistant, moved to production and later became an announcer. It was in 1959 that the now famous “Cardboard Shoes” gimmick was born. Instead of using his own name he tried a pseudonym. It has followed him around the world since.

After his release from the RAF he joined British Forces Network (which later changed its name to British Forces Broadcasting Service) as a civilian announcer and his first assignment was in 1961 posted to the sweltering hot desert of Kuwait during the Iraqi crisis. Here he set up a small station and broadcast to most parts of the world from where service personnel had been sent to Kuwait.

Later that year he was moved to Kenya with Forces radio. Mention the years 1916-1964 [sic: 1956-1964 – Ed] and Keith’s reaction is “those were the good old days”. Busy days, too for as usual he began to look for something completely different to do. In this case we substitute “do” for “conquer”. He successfully reached the summit of Mount Kilamanjaro (19,340 feet) in October 1962 along with a team of RAF personnel, who were the first services expedition not to lose any one on the way up, or down. Asked why he attempted such an exhausting feat Keith replied; “I wanted to get to the top in life!”.

Whilst in Kenya he wrote a pop page for the “Daily Nation”, and edited a features page for the “Sunday Post”.

On radio he picked up awards two years running for his series “Skues Me” and “Skueball Speshall” … climbed yet another mountain — Mount Kenya (17,058 feet) … directed a number of films including “The BFBS Story”, “Kilamanjaro — What a Long Walk”, “Wild Life in East Africa” … and appeared on local television.

In 1963 he returned to London and was attached to the BBC on a three month senior programme training course. It was just after his return to Nairobi that Kenya gained its independence, BFBS was closed down and after a stint in Swaziland, Keith was posted to Aden where he remained for three months.

“Trouble seems to follow me around the world — Kuwait, Zanzibar, Tanzyanika, Uganda and Kenya which had uprisings and mutinies, and I spent a few weeks in Swaziland during some trouble they had down there. In Aden I was up to my neck in it with the Radfan fighting. So I opted for a more peaceful life and packed my numerous kit bags and returned to England.”

Whilst at the BBC the bug for radio in Britain had bitten him and he came back once again to do something completely different. It was in 1964 that pirate radio began broadcasting off the shores of the British Isles and Keith joined Radio Caroline which was anchored off the Essex coast and where he worked two weeks on board and a week ashore. He became a regular presenter of the 9-12 morning show and admits that the highlight of his days with Caroline was when he escorted Prince Richard of Gloucester to the ship and interviewed him on air.

Keith moved to land based commercial radio in January 1966 working for Radio Luxembourg and presenting his own show sponsored by CBS records.

In May 1966 he was back at sea again but this time with Radio London — “I was writing a book about the pirates and wanted to experience as much variety as possible.”

He worked with many disc jockeys who are now broadcasting with ILR stations today.

“The pirates were outlawed by the British Government in August 1967 which was a sad blow. Pirate radio had proved really popular and had created a need for all day music and entertainment with an informal approach. Radio One was set up as a substitute, if you like, but on a national network. It more or less replaced the pirate stations.”

Keith came ashore and was offered a regular job with the BBC and was one of the original disc jockeys on Radio One. He was best known perhaps for his compering of “Saturday Club” but he was also a regular host of “Radio One Club”, “Family Choice”, “Pop Inn”, “Today”, “Disc Jockey Derby”, “Night Ride” and “Coming Home”.

He has appeared on many television shows including “Top Of The Pops”, “Thank Your Lucky Stars”, “Juke Box Jury”, “Pop The Question”, “Rough with the Smooth”, “Pop Quest”, “Calendar” and the “Kenneth Williams Show”.

He remained with the BBC until 1974 having worked on “The Story of Pop”, a radio series which was sold around the world. He co-wrote many of the episodes and was editor of the series. He joined Radio Hallam as Programme Director in March 1974.

Keith was appointed Vice-President of the National Association of Youth Clubs (Patron — HM The Queen Mother) in 1972 and is actively involved in voluntary work for the organisation up and down the country.

Off the air he likes writing and to his credit are “Pop Went The Pirates”, “Radio Onederland” (the story of Radio One) and “The History of the Skues Family”. Keith is a Lord’s Taverner, holds a private pilots licence, writes sleeve notes for LP record covers, has appeared in the film “Sunday Bloody Sunday”, is the voice behind many television and radio commercials, has represented Great Britain as a DJ in South Africa (1971) and in the last three years has been presented to HM the Queen Mother, HRH Duke of Edinburgh, HRH Prince Charles, HRH Princess Alice of Athlone, and HRH Princess Alexandra.

He is sorry that no-one from Radio Hallam met the Queen during her visit to Sheffield. Says Keith “We could quite easily have spoken to Her Majesty during our broadcast, as we were within touching distance, but that would not have been protocol.

Skues is the only Programme Director in Britain who is heard seven days a week with his own show, including “Lunch with a Punch” every weekday 12.00 midday-2.00 p.m. “It’s better than working,” he admits.

Bill Crozier

Bill Crozier

Bill Crozier started at a very early age in the entertainment business making his first public appearance at the age of 6½ years, playing solo piano in a local drill hall to an admiring family and a somewhat less enchanted audience. His mop of curly hair won the day — a crowd pleaser he has long since had to manage without.

A sickly child, he spent a large part of his childhood either going to or coming from the Great Ormond Street Hospital for Sick Children — except for a year in a convalescent home in Wiltshire, an experience from which that county has only just begun to recover.

He had a long and very successful career in motor engineering, nursery gardening and journalism (having been a grease monkey, muck spreader and paper boy in quick succession). He finally found a niche in domestic service, where he quickly climbed the social ladder from hall boy to fourth footman in about eighteen months, and managed to combine these not too arduous duties with the running of the local dance band. Bill’s natural progression to the butler’s pantry and the green baize apron, was impeded by the even more grandiose schemes of another member of the lower orders — an Austrian gentleman in the decorating trade. Since then Bill has been a strong supporter of D.I.Y.

Bill Crozier

Bill Crozier seen here with some of the hundreds of postcards received for his very popular 2-way link with RTE Radio in Dublin.

He joined the R.A.F.V.R. with his eyes on a pair of wings, but his feet stayed on the ground — they failed him on eyesight. He became one of the original ground gunners, before they were elevated to the title of R.A.F. Regiment, and finished up a marksman. (That was the second medical mistake for which he admits to being eternally grateful. The first occurred at his parturition, when the attendant doctor shook his head sadly and walked away.) Owing to an oversight, during the battle of the Bulge he found himself in the front line. Deciding that was no place for a devout coward, he started to run, but, with his usual inattention to detail went in the wrong direction, and bumped into a patrol of the enemy who surrendered to him, no doubt mistaking his terrorstriken leap for one of aggression. He was politely led to a huge camp inhabited by 2,000 German W.A.A.F. and would probably still be there if hostilities had not abruptly ceased.

After that, becoming a Senior Gunnery Instructor seemed natural.

In 1948, he joined the staff of B.F.N. in Hamburg, and remained with them until 1965, presenting the Cologne end of Two-Way Family Favourites with Jean Metcalfe for the last years of his sojourn in Germany. Since then Bill has been a freelance writer/broadcaster working as he puts it “for anyone and everyone”.

Having presented ‘Cozier with Crozier’, a nightly show for Hallam since the station opened in October 1974, he admits to being entirely happy in Sheffield and promises to stay forever — which might give lovers of wild life and a peaceful existence some food for thought! His ever faithful companion, Florence (Nightingale), merely preens herself and dreams of Berkeley Square.

For example, he wrote an appreciation of the writer Scott Fitzgerald, which was broadcast world-wide; wrote and presented two programmes on Operetta, which, two months later, the BBC asked him to repeat because of the listener reaction; did two nine-month long stints on “Music Through Midnight”; took over the presentation of “Those Were The Days”, ostensibly for three months, and that period was extended to six years; became a freelance producer with the BBC and was responsible for “Roundabout” for many months, as well as hundreds of recording sessions with well known singers and orchestras; took part in the special musical programme for Noel Coward, in which he spoke to people like Anna Neagle, Jessie Mathews, Hermione Gingold, Rita Streich, Francis Day etc., etc.; capped all that by becoming the studio producer for the Jimmy Young Show, which he handled for over 18 months.

Roger Moffat

Roger Moffat

Roger Moffat became an announcer with the British Forces Network, Graz, Austria in 1947. He spotted a notice on the camp board which asked for personnel with broadcasting experience to apply for a post with B.F.N. Says Roger: “I thought I would apply. Mind you, the only microphone I had ever seen was at a village hall and then I’d never spoken into one. Really I bluffed my way into B.F.N. I made up a lot of stories about my imaginary radio career, filled in the necessary forms and I was accepted. I knew the Army wouldn’t check because they are too…! I later became Senior Announcer — mind you, there were only two of us”.

Roger Moffat was demobbed in 1948 and returned to England and joined Radio Luxembourg in their London offices as the Continuity Script Writer.

He stayed with the station for six months and then decided to take up agriculture instead, as he couldn’t see any future in radio. He went to work on several farms which was followed by a course at the Royal Agricultural College in Cirencester, Gloucestershire.

Roger goes on, “One afternoon I had a phone-call from Radio Luxembourg who asked me to fly out to the Grand Duchy the following day and join the staff as an announcer. So I flung ‘my plough’ on one side and caught the first train to London and then literally leapt into an aircraft bound for Luxembourg. I remained with ‘208’ for six months and when I set my mind on London, Pete Murray (then unknown) was chosen as my successor. I applied for a job to the BBC and they sent me on a fortnight’s course for announcer training. At the end of it I was told that ‘I would never make an announcer in a million years’. But by coincidence the BBC were, at that time, very short of ‘voices’ and I was asked to go to Manchester as summer relief for a fortnight. I stayed there not fourteen days, but fourteen years”.

With the BBC in the North Region, Roger introduced every conceivable kind of broadcast, ranging from classical concerts to record request shows and from church services to military brass band concerts. Other sections took in the news, both on sound and television. He was the regular presenter of ‘Melody on the Line’, ‘Workers Playtime’ and the Al Read Show.

Roger’s claim to fame was ‘Make Way for Music’ which began as a radio series and later ended up as one of the most popular series on television. This was a band show featuring the Northern Dance Orchestra, conducted by Alyn Ainsworth and songs presented by Sheila Buxton. Roger’s off-beat approach brought him millions of new fans.

‘Make Way for Music’ is still talked about especially the television shows. Originally it was planned for a weeks ‘fill-in’ but so many hundred of letters were received that it was retained for three months, then another three. The series ran on television for almost four years.

“On our first show, the orchestra were all in braces — there was no scenery — and everyone was all over the place. We went on the air and I decided to eat fish and chips with Sheila Buxton on a park bench. The BBC were not amused, but the viewers loved it.”

Other highlights in the television series included the time when Roger actually blew up the television studio and caused havoc both on and off the screen.

ROGER MOFFAT alias SUPERWOMBLE

Norman George headed the string section of the Northern Dance Orchestra and each week Roger grabbed his violin and smashed it into hundreds of pieces during transmission. One week it was decided to do a ‘send-up’ of Max Jaffa and his Trio. Roger was the cellist. The producer phoned the local second hand shop where they used to buy the duff violins and asked instead for a cello. The show went on the air live. Norman George this time got hold of Roger’s cello jumped on it and broke it into many hundreds of pieces. A few minutes later, a rather bewildered shopkeeper phoned and said I didn’t realise you were going to break the cello. It was worth £200!

The ‘Make Way for Music’ production team paid up and all was well.

Roger also appeared in the successful television series featuring Pinky and Perky.

He left Manchester in 1965 and moved to London as an announcer with the BBC. During his stay he has introduced ‘Music Through Midnight’, ‘Roundabout’, ‘Night Ride’ and the usual programmes which continuity announcers present.

On more than one occasion Roger’s tongue has got him into trouble. During a dance band programme Mr. Moffat, trying to find something new to say about the song ‘I Can’t Give You Anything But Love’, announced “Someone once said it is better to give than to receive, or something like that, can’t think who it was. Anyway he’s bound to be dead by now and probably you’ve never heard of him — or want to”.

The phones never stopped ringing and the letters poured in. Words to the effect that ‘it is better to give than receive’ were said by one Jesus Christ!

Roger remembers another story connected with ‘Make Way for Music’. Some fifteen minutes before going on the air live, he received a telephone call from one of our premier Dukes who explained that he had a young nephew and niece in a stately home who were ardent fans of the programme and always listened to it when having their lunch in the nursery. However, on that particular Friday, the Duke and Duchess were entertaining the Queen and other members of the Royal Family to lunch and the two children were ‘commanded’ to attend.

“They flatly refused to miss the broadcast,” His Grace informed me, and would I speak to them, and see if I could persuade them what an honour it was to have lunch with the Queen. But to no avail. ‘Make Way for Music’ took preference, even over Her Majesty! In the end, I understand a compromise was reached. The children would lunch with the Royal party providing they could have their radio on as well! And that, as far as I know, is what happened. It was a great temptation to mention this on the programme, but the Duke asked me not to. I was dying to start the programme with ‘Your Majesties, Your Royal Highnesses, Your Graces, My Lords, Ladies and Gentlemen — Make Way for Music’. Perhaps it’s just as well I didn’t’.”

In January 1968 Roger took over as compere of the Joe Loss Show, which was followed by the ‘Billy Ternent Show’ and another spell on ‘Night Ride’.

Roger joined the BBC on July 25th, 1951 and was ‘fired’ for being ‘totally irresponsible’ just 20 years later — his birthday, July 25th, 1971. Quotes Roger, “Normally when a member of staff is fired for being totally irresponsible, he is dismissed immediately. However, because I had been with the BBC for 20 years they gave me six months notice, finally winding up with a six hour show on Boxing Night 1971— six hours to myself with no producer, no secretary, no no-body! So I was totally irresponsible to the end.”

The week after Roger had been fired by the BBC, he was back again with a twenty-one week series on Saturday lunchtime with the BBC Radio Orchestra featuring well-known singing stars and personalities. His voice was also heard quite regularly on television both in comedy shows and on television commercials.

Roger Moffat joined Radio Hallam on July 1st, 1974 and can be heard regularly between 9 a.m./12 noon each week day.

He was the main commentator during The Queen’s visit to Sheffield in July 1975.

Johnny Moran

Johnny Moran

Waking up ‘Hallamland’ is the role of JOHNNY MORAN, the early morning breakfast personality on Radio Hallam, whose show is comprised of lively popular music interspersed with items of local information, time checks, weather and news.

Although Johnny is a newcomer to the area, some years ago the Moran family lived in Sheffield and Johnny’s mother was born in the city. The Moran’s emigrated to Australia where Johnny was born and educated and first talked into a microphone working for radio stations 3AW in Melbourne and 3YB in the seaside resort of Warrnambool — commercial radio stations similar in many ways to Radio Hallam.

Having learnt something of radio announcing, travel was his next desire so Johnny boarded a ship and visited Singapore, Ceylon, Aden, Egypt, Italy and France, en route to London, where he applied for work with the BBC but was refused even an audition.

An introduction to Radio Luxembourg at a time when there was a DJ job vacant lead to Johnny flying to the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg where he was one of the 208 team from 1964 to 1966, and it was during this time he first came to know Keith Skues who presented Johnny with a badge advertising his station Radio Caroline, the wearing of which did not amuse the manager of Luxembourg.

After two years abroad, Johnny decided to further his career by again trying to join the BBC … without success.

During 1966, Johnny taped some films and commercials, worked as a DJ and compere at the Marquee Club in London, and recorded sponsored radio programmes for the off-shore pirate station Radio London. It was at the Marquee that he first met Radio Hallam’s Roger Moffat.

At the end of that year, it was third time lucky and Johnny started work for the BBC Light Programme, working for the first time with Roger, Keith and Bill Crozier.

In seven years with the BBC, Johnny introduced programmes which ranged from Radio One Club, Housewives’ Choice, What’s New, a Golden Oldies programme, a Soft Rock programme, and the pop magazine programme Scene and Heard which ran for almost six years.

Among the highlights of his time with the BBC, Johnny counts two special programmes on the Beatles, and in 1972, a trip to Canada representing the BBC which gave him a chance to see top North American radio stations in action in Montreal and Toronto.

While working mainly in radio, Johnny has made several guest appearances on both BBC and Independent Television programmes and has worked as an announcer on BBC-TV. Further radio activities include programmes for BBC World Service and the British Forces Broadcasting Service which have been heard throughout the world.

In 1974, while working for British Forces and recording a series of shows syndicated in North America, Johnny met Keith Skues at a party given for singer Barry White and first heard about the plans for a commercial radio station based in Sheffield.

Keith was due to go to Sheffield after the party so Johnny offered to drive him to the railway station. Johnny got lost — Keith missed the train — but Radio Hallam were awarded a contract to start broadcasting!

Johnny’s was the first voice heard on the new radio station when it officially opened at 6 a.m. on the first of October, 1974, and despite a couple of hitches and a jumping record, he remembers that day as one of the most exciting of his career.

Johnny enjoys a wide taste in music and likes the exotic in motor cars, food, drink, and travelling which is still high on his list of favourite pastimes. An accomplished sportsman, he has been a member of Radio Hallam’s teams at cricket, football and motoring and is trying to learn to be a good loser, although he has high hopes of forming a winning combination for Hallam at darts!

Johnny is married and has a labrador dog, a black cat and a fairly sizeable collection of records, although he’s wary of loaning them to Roger Moffat who has still never returned a Barbara Streisand album borrowed five years ago.

With the extension of Radio Hallam’s broadcasting hours, you can hear the Johnny Moran Breakfast Show from 5 a.m. while 9 a.m., and on Wednesday evenings he returns 8 while 11 p.m. for the Soft Rock and Soul (thanks to a slip of the tongue, better known as the Soft Sock and Roll) Show.

Brenda Ellison

Brenda Ellison

I’m sure you’ve had that feeling … sitting there and thinking “How on earth did I get here. What am I doing here? Why Me? I must be mad”. And at the same time knowing deep down, that wild horses wouldn’t drag you to anywhere else. It’s one of those very special moments when you know that you’ve achieved what you’ve always wanted to achieve.

Well that’s exactly how I felt on October 1st, 1974. Sitting in Studio A of Radio Hallam. By then we were all used to the name, Hallam, but the idea that we would actually get on the air, on time, and that there would be people tuned in on 194 was a very different matter. But they certainly did, and it wasn’t long before they let us know they were listening. It was a tremendous thrill to see out switchboard jammed with calls from people enjoying our programmes.

And then there were the happenings on day one … the gram decks seizing up, the cartridge machines all playing at once, Yorkshire Television filming Roger and I, being blinded by the lights, our glass window breaking and having to be repaired in the middle of the programme. Oh … all these memories and impressions come whizzing back. I felt I needed four ears and two pairs of eyes, to take it all in. We shall never see another October the first of the like again!

But as to how I got there. I hadn’t always wanted to work in Radio, but funnily enough, looking back, it seems as if events had decided for me that there could never be anything else. I suppose it all started at school in Ecclesfield where I was given parts in plays, and thoroughly enjoyed them. In fact they became, as far as I was concerned, the main reason for school. Then I had to decide what to read at University, and there was only one thing really for me … Drama. Now this was no ordinary theatre course, theatre was one side … radio was the other. We had our own broadcasting studio, but being a University there was nobody to transmit to, so in my opinion not much point in doing the thing at all. Much better to have the citizens of a whole city to listen … local radio had just opened in Sheffield, and I needed to earn some money in the summer vacation. The whole thing fitted together very nicely. I got hooked!

That’s how my love affair with Radio started. From London to Manchester I’ve flown upside down in aircraft, I’ve gone up in a hot air balloon — I’ve even interviewed lavatory ladies in their own abode … and now I’m with Hallam, learning from the experts. Anybody who works with Keith, Roger, and Bill can’t help but have their standards raised, and I owe them a big thank-you. But more than ever … Long live commercial radio, and long may Hallam prosper … it’s one of my best friends and I hope it’s one of yours too!

Colin Slade

Colin Slade

Colin Slade is a man of Kent (or is it Kentish man ?) and it was there that he was bitten by the broadcasting bug. At fifteen, he was running the radio set up at All Saints Hospital in Chatham — one microphone and one record player in the plush studio surroundings of broom cupboard with adjoining loo! His introduction to rock music came a year later with his appointment as Social Secretary at Medway and Maidstone College of Technology, where he booked bands like Gentle Giant, Van Der Graaf Generator, Lindisfarne and Quiver all for under £60. “I’d never heard of them before”, said Colin “but they all became quite famous and I think this was the most important part of my musical education.” But it was these humble beginnings that landed Colin a job with BBC Radio Medway in January 1971, presenting a weekly rock show. Within a few months he had progressed to breakfast and afternoon shows, requests and even newsreading. During this time Colin experimented with the format of his rock show, developing the two hour in-depth interview programmes with well known stars, such as Colin Blunstone, Fairport Convention, Alex Harvey and the late Graham Bond.

In May 1974 he left the BBC to pursue a freelance interview career. This did not last long however. On hearing about Radio Hallam he saw an opportunity to work with his two all time favourite broadcasting heros, Keith Skues and Roger Moffat. So after a brief return to the Beeb at Blackburn, Lancashire, Colin arrived in Sheffield in September to present Radio Hallam’s afternoon magazine, Roundabout and the Hallam Rock Show. Away from the studio Colin is a man of many interests. He claims to be an absolute “loony” when it comes to musical instruments. “I can’t resist them and my collection includes several guitars, two mandolins, a banjoline, ukelele, and even a one string fiddle!” Colin is also a very keen collector of antiques and medals and is quite knowledgeable about British and German Militaria. He’s also an enthusiastic target shooter when time permits.

In May 1975 Colin married Marie Bird, a receptionist at Radio Hallam.

COLIN SLADE with “Roundabout” guest ROGER DALTREY

Ray Stuart

Ray Stuart

Ray Stuart started his show business career whilst serving in the Royal Air Force in Germany in 1956. Along with three other members of the R.A.F. he joined a skiffle group called the Northwest Ramblers and they played at various dances on the R.A.F. Camp and as they got better progressed into local German clubs.

After leaving the R.A.F. in January 1959, the group split up, but on returning to Sheffield Ray decided to join a Rock n Roll group called the Main Liners.

The group were fairly successful, playing at working men’s clubs throughout the area.

No degree of success came though until Ray left the Main Liners and formed a group called Frankenstein and the Monsters in 1961.

Until 1967 the group became very well known, both in this country and abroad, but due to bad agents and manager, Ray decided to call singing a day and get a proper job.

The proper job never materialised and he decided to become a D.J.

For the next two years Ray worked at the Black Swan in Sheffield and many other pubs and clubs gaining as much experience as possible. In 1969 he applied for a freelance job at BBC Radio, Sheffield, and was successful, and until 1974 worked for the BBC Local Radio learning as much as possible about Radio technique. On October 1st, 1974, Ray joined Radio Hallam, and is the regular presenter of ‘Countdown’ as well as the ‘Ray Stuart Show’ (9 p.m. – 12 midnight, Saturday: and 9 a m. – 12 midday, Sundays) He is also joint presenter of ‘Hallam Express’

Beverley Chubb

Beverley Chubb

Beverley Ellen Chubb was born in England in 1948 but was shipped to the Colonial parts at a very early age and later educated in Perth, West Australia.

She did plan to do a University course in History but had failed the exams. Beverley decided on a life of leisure but within a few months her parents bludgeoned her into earning a living. So she became a Dental Nurse, qualified and left — she couldn’t stand it … so she moved to work as a clerk for a transport firm and left — she couldn’t stand it … she worked as a barmaid for half an hour and was sacked. So she spent most of her time hanging around with folk and surfing crowds, took guitar lessons, used to spend a lot of time checking out local bands and was thrown out of home by irate parents.

She moved into a flat with two music freaks, played hippies until she was forced to become more respectable and joined the Perth Dental Hospital, whereupon she was immediately posted out with a mobile crew to the remote bush towns. In her spare time she formed a local folk group, who played for their own amusement, guesting at local dances. She moved to Sydney for a month, returned to Perth and eventually left for England in April 1970.

Beverley subsequently toured Europe for four months, worked on odd occasions, and was invited to join Radio Luxembourg as a typist. But she doesn’t do things in small doses and ended up as Assistant to the Programme Director, being responsible for production, playlists and artists liaison. Realising she could not become Managing Director for at least another five years she joined Radio Hallam as Music Producer and is now responsible for looking after the weekly playlist and all visiting artists as well as liaising with record companies and running the record library.

Beverley is the regular presenter of the midnight to 3.00 a.m. Saturday show “Chubbing with Chubb”. She’s also a regular contributor to the motoring programme on Fridays.

Liz Davies

Liz Davies

Liz confesses that she’s in broadcasting simply because she’s never done anything like it before. Despite her voice test for Hallam sounding (so Liz says) “like Basil Brush imitating Emperor Rosko” she was chosen because of her experience in dealing with people (and animals) in many kinds of problem situations.

Between being born in Hathersage, Derbyshire and joining Radio Hallam she went to school in a few places then started off a somewhat chequered career as an animal technician in Cambridge working with rats, followed by further research, this time with humans, into stomach ulcers. From there (Liz states it seemed quite logical at the time) she progressed to psychiatric social work, and became a Mental Welfare Officer. But after four years she found herself once again looking after animals — this time as a veterinary anaesthetist. Other short term employment included being a personnel officer, a window dresser, racehorse groom, farm labouress and finally ended up back in research studying the problem of infertility in women.

So it could be said (amongst other things) that Liz is ideally qualified to certify an infertile rat with a gastric ulcer.

Liz admits that as the newest and least experienced addition to Radio Hallam’s presentation staff, at first the control desk in the studio looked like something from an Apollo space flight deck, and surrounded by so many professionals she makes the comparison that she felt like Lucille Ball in N.A.S.A. However, she’s since learned where to kick things. The “paws” button on the tape machine has had to be covered up as Barney kept pressing it, and we’ve heard rumours that after he’s eaten Florence he has plans for a “coup d’ chat”.

In a more serious vein, Liz states that she’s deeply indebted to the rest of the staff for the help and encouragement she has had, and still continues to receive. It all adds up, all the talking, meeting people, music, deafening noise and air of unpredictability to an immensely enjoyable experience being the presenter of ‘Tis Liz every weekday afternoon.

LIZ DAVIES shares a joke with LULU, one of the many studio guests featured in “TIS LIZ”

Frank Carpenter

Frank Carpenter

Frank Carpenter joined Radio Hallam on September 1st, 1974, a month before the station went ‘on air’.

While having a varied musical taste Frank enjoys country music the most, and is pleased to see it becoming more popular and now regularly entering the pop charts. He is keen to promote country music and to bring it to a wider audience.

Before joining Radio Hallam Frank built and operated his own mobile discotheque; his main job being accountancy.

From the time of offshore commercial radio Frank has been trying to become a disc jockey, his one ambition. To achieve this aim he went to Vancouver, Canada to learn his trade, in North America the home of commercial radio. He learnt a lot from studying at the Broadcast Department of the British Columbia Institute of Technology and from the experts at CHQM and CKWX in Vancouver. Frank returned well versed in the varied techniques of broadcasting, from the hosting of record and open line telephone shows; to air-time selling, copywriting etc., through to radio station management. This valuable experience stood Frank in good stead for his present job in programming.

Frank is 5′ 10½” tall, has fair hair and blue eyes. He is slim and athletic (his own words!) although finds little time for sport as radio is an all consuming activity (his wife’s words!!) Whenever possible he plays tennis, table tennis or goes skating. Frank enjoys travelling and meeting people. During the Summer of 1973 he travelled over 10,000 miles across the length and breadth of the U.S.A, and Canada on a Greyhound coach, taking the opportunity to listen to and visit radio stations across the continent.

Kelly Temple

Kelly Temple

Born on the 19th February, 1953. Height 5’8″. Black hair, Brown eyes.

Kelly started his career as a DJ at the age of 14, working one night a week in a Leicester Youth Club.

His broadcasting career began in 1972 when he joined BBC Radio Humberside as a freelance DJ.

In between time Kelly was studying to qualify for a Medical Course, but instead joined a large company in a junior managerial position. In his spare time he sang with a pop group and worked in the nightclubs.

1974 was a successful year for Kelly when he made an appearance on “Top of the Pops”, and joined Radio Hallam presenting “Saturday Spin” most Saturday lunchtimes.

Kelly now presents the weekend breakfast show.

Kelly, who is single, drives a red sports car and enjoys-tennis, water skiing and gliding.

His taste of music varies from Johnny Mathis, and Cliff Richard to Barry White and the Philly Sound. His favourite female singer is Diana Ross. You only have to listen to the breakfast show each weekend to find out the variation in his musical taste.

Rev. Ernest Marvin

Rev. Ernest Marvin

Radio Hallam’s Religious Producer is the Reverend Ernest Marvin who was born in Dumfrieshire, Scotland. He took a degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics at Oxford and later went to Cambridge to read Theology.

Ernest was ordained in 1956 and spent sixteen years at St. James’ Presbyterian Church, Lockleaze, Bristol. These were pioneering days, he recalls, and it was at this church that he and a colleague, Ewan Hooper, wrote one of the first Rock Operas “A Man Dies”. It was a drama which followed the Medieval Mystery Plays which brought together humour, satire and social comment with a Gospel Story and it was performed in modern dress.

After first appearing at a church hall, “A Man Dies” moved one year later, in 1961, to the Colston Hall, Bristol. The production was later televised by ABC Television and subsequently a long playing record “A Man Dies” was released by EMI Records.

A Question was asked in the House of Commons seeking permission to ban the production for its apparently irreligious nature. But the Show went on. “A Man Dies” was presented on Radio Hallam on Good Friday 1975.

Ernest Marvin came to Sheffield in 1973, having spent twelve months in the USA preaching and lecturing. He is a minister of St. Andrews United Reformed Church in Upper Hanover Street, Sheffield, as well as being the Chaplain to the University of Sheffield.

His weekly programme “Break For Faith” is heard on Sundays at 9.00 p.m. and he is regularly joined by the Reverend Trevor Pitt, vicar of St. Johns Church, Gleadless Valley, and Mr. Peter Lewis, the singer and broadcaster.

1975 ● THIS IS TRANSDIFFUSION